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What Are The Main Parts Of An Essay Introduction Paragraph


The introductory paragraph of an essay is a very crucial part. It is what makes the reader want to continue reading the essay. It is more than just making a statement, but a way to summarize the coming content of the essay. This article will explain the key components of an introduction paragraph, why they are important, and how to organize the parts properly.

The parts of an introduction paragraph

  • The hook
  • Support
  • Thesis

The Hook


Each introduction paragraph is comprised of three parts. The first part is the opening statement, also known as the hook. Its sole purpose is to hook the attention of the reader and draw them into the essay. This statement can be shocking a statement or an interesting question. You can use an interesting fact, a statistic, or a personal experience to gain the attention of the audience.

Support


The next part in an introduction is the support, or supporting evidence. Supporting evidence is the information included in the introduction that will be the link from the hook of the introduction to the thesis. It will include relevant information about the direction the paper is going in. It explains why the writer feels the way it does about the particular topic. This is a clarification point in the introduction. It is located after the hook but before the thesis of the essay.

Thesis


The thesis of an introduction is incredibly important, almost as important as the hook. The thesis states your standing on the topic. It will lay out the plan and direction the essay is going. Without the thesis, the introduction will have no real purpose. This statement informs the audience of the points you will be arguing and why. All the information prior to the final sentence is vital to stating the thesis.

The introduction paragraph in an essay is the most essential part of an essay. It grabs the audience’s attention, gives them an idea on why the essay was written, and states why the topic is being argued. Without the introduction paragraph, the reader may be confused about the information and why it is there. Introductions are designed to clarify what the rest of the essay is going to be focusing on, what facts can back up the claims made, and how these facts tie into your personal standing on the subject.